MAGAZINES

MC Systems Insight
MC Power Technology Manager
MC RPG Developer
MC Power Developer
MC TNT Tips 'n Techniques
MC AIX Expert
MC Linux Expert
MC Mobile on Power
This Week @ the MC Press Bookstore

December 15, 2010 | Volume 9 Issue 24

ISSUE HIGHLIGHTS

TOP STORY: What Is the Difference Between *OMIT and *NOPASS?
FEATURED ARTICLE: The API Corner: Still Using Compile-Time Arrays?
NEWS HIGHLIGHT: Quadrant Software Acquired by Candescent Partners Private Equity Firm
FORUM: Error in Encrypting Data Using RSA
ON-DEMAND WEBCAST: Introducing ASNA Wings
Manage Subscription | Contact Us

Sponsor - T.L. Ashford & Associates
 
T.L. Ashford is “The Labeling Answer”® for the System i.

Ashford's Barcode400 has been the dependable choice for the industry since 1983. With Barcode400's newly enhanced Graphic Designer no “green screen” interaction is needed for label design. New features include: AFP/HP-compatible printing, easy-to-use graphics import tool, test print to desktop printer, simple font download tool, updated drivers and format listing reports. Even compliance labeling is made easy with design templates. Call 800-541-4893 to order your Fully-Functional, FREE Trial Software or visit us at T.L. Ashford & Associates.

Also, be sure to download the new white paper: Bar Code / RFID Label Printing, Don't get caught in the integration trap.


Read More >>

Feature Article - Programming
 
What Is the Difference Between *OMIT and *NOPASS?

Do you know the best way to use optional parameters with procedures?

tom_snyderWritten by Tom Snyder

When you're using procedures, you have to ability to support optional parameters by using the special keywords *NOPASS and *OMIT. This article discusses the difference between the two and the appropriate times to use them.


Read More >>

Feature Article - Programming
 
The API Corner: Still Using Compile-Time Arrays?

There are better ways for storing textual information.

bruce_viningWritten by Bruce Vining

As a contract programmer, I have the opportunity to review quite a bit of i-based code that is to be rewritten as part of various modernization efforts. One programming style that I encounter fairly often is the use of compile-time arrays to store textual information for use on displays and reports. These companies' databases may have, for instance, an order-status field (OrdSts) with values such as P, O, C, H, I, R, and S to represent order pending, order, order canceled, order held by accounting, order held due to inventory, order released for processing, and order shipped, respectively. When returning order status information to a user, the application programs may then utilize a compile-time array, as shown below, to provide a textual description of the order status through a display or printer file character variable (Status).


Read More >>

In the News

Read More >>
Support MC Press - Visit Our Sponsors

Forums Sponsor

POPULAR FORUMS

Forums

Search Sponsor

Search


Read More >>
   MC-STORE.COM