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This Week @ the MC Press Bookstore

 September 10, 2007  |  Volume 2, Issue 16

 

In This Issue:
>>
Internal or External? Two Methods of Providing Business Intelligence to Partners
>> Choosing and Implementing an Encryption Solution

Feature Article - Application Software
 
Internal or External? Two Methods of Providing Business Intelligence to Partners

The key to any successful business intelligence or data warehousing solution is its ability to provide information to those who need it.

CEOs want a lot these days:

  • Lower costs
  • Improved customer and supplier satisfaction
  • Better product quality
  • Decreased time to market
  • Business growth
  • Enhanced competitive advantages
  • And more!

The solutions they are examining most earnestly to achieve these goals fall under the umbrella called "business intelligence." An appropriate business intelligence solution transforms raw business data into meaningful information that can be used to make timely decisions to advance these goals. The business intelligence solution needs to work not only internally, but also externally, with outside partners that include customers, vendors, and other parties in the supply chain. The key to any successful business intelligence or data warehousing solution is its ability to provide information to those who need it.


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Feature Article - Security
 
Choosing and Implementing an Encryption Solution

There's more than one way to secure and protect your important data.

Over the last few years, hundreds of corporations have been featured in headlines for data security breaches. According to the Privacy Rights Clearinghouse, the records of over 158 million U.S. residents have been exposed by security breaches since January 2005. That's more than half of the U.S. population.

Lost or stolen backup tapes contributed to a large number of these breaches, yet protecting backup data is still often overlooked. Many companies believe that it is useless to protect these tapes because they contain "old" information only used for disaster recovery (DR), but even just one compromised backup tape can cost a company its reputation, its competitive advantage, and thousands in fines. The Ponemon Institute research firm reported that data breaches cost companies an average of $182 per compromised record in legal fees and other expenses.


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