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Transferrability of SQL/400 knowledge?

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  • Guest's Avatar
    Guest replied
    Transferrability of SQL/400 knowledge?

    Thanks to all for your comments and suggestions.

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  • Guest's Avatar
    Guest replied
    Transferrability of SQL/400 knowledge?

    I know SQL pretty well, and as a "universal" language I should be able to do well on other platforms. However, most of the SQL job listings I see specify a platform, like Oracle or "4+ years experience with Microsoft SQL Server". Can I reasonably apply for such positions or am I hosed? I don't imagine it would take me long to learn the quirks of the particular versions of SQL, but I don't have any idea about the toolsets that may be associated with the particular platforms. (This is distinct in my mind from knowing about database management tools, like how to partition an Oracle table across 10 disk drives. That would maybe be more of DB Admin position. I'm just talking about coding queries, stored procs, triggers, etc.) On a related note, many job postings want knowledge of SDLC (Software Development Life Cycle). I'm not even sure what that is. I'm from a small iSeries shop where we barely even had change management. How much of a killer is it to not have that? How hard to pick up?

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  • Guest's Avatar
    Guest replied
    Transferrability of SQL/400 knowledge?

    I'm guessing you are looking for a/another job and I'll give you my experience from recent (2004) job hunting. When you submit a resume it is scanned by selection software looking for a certain number of hits on buzzwords. Most resumes are deleted before they reach a human being. Any jobs listed on the internet are open world-wide, and when the job requires very specific skills, experience and knowledge the company will not look at anyone who does not have precisely the skills they require. If the job is advertised in the paper, the company will not see an applicant who does not have the required skills unless they can't find a suitable applicant and decide they might take someone who can be brought up to speed with minimal training. Best sources for jobs are recruiters, who can sell you as having pretty much the necessary skills though in a slightly different package, and networking. You need a human go-between to get into a good position.

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  • ACT
    replied
    Transferrability of SQL/400 knowledge?

    Popular 4GLs surviving the current software market M&A used SQL. It's where the DBAs and developers using these tools that make a ton of money nowadays . They are very in-demand and don't have to make McDo as a home address just to qualify for "LOCALS" only ad.

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  • R.Daugherty
    replied
    Transferrability of SQL/400 knowledge?

    Certainly no reflection on yours or anyone's skills, Ken, just that there is little beyond the four trivial verbs that are on the checklist of someone with another platform. rd

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  • Guest's Avatar
    Guest replied
    Transferrability of SQL/400 knowledge?

    I have SQL skills beyond "four trivial SQL verbs", but I guess I see your point -- they don't care if you can make a database dance and sing, they just care about checkboxes on their "OK" list.

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  • R.Daugherty
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    Transferrability of SQL/400 knowledge?

    I know SQL pretty well, and as a "universal" language I should be able to do well on other platforms. You're in for a rude awakening. Nobody gives two hoots about four trivial SQL verbs. What IT honcho types care about are 1) OS, 2) database, 3) language, and 4) whether you've drank their flavor of Kool-Aid, sort of in that order, but if you haven't chugged the Kool-Aid, the first three don't count. And by language, I don't mean SQL. It is the language that will use the SQL. My take on the SDLC thing is that it's an attempt to see if you follow a rigorous methodology of software development and maintenance, in other words, are a disciplined enterprise level of programmer. There are key concepts at all levels, many of which I don't use, such as UML or database design tools, or object oriented analysis and design with role playing scenarios. They will want to know that you take software through multiple levels of change management in Develop, Test, QA, and Production cycles, and what change management software you're familiar with. You would need at a minimum to be familiar with CVS, but what they really want is that you did it on their OS, with their database, in their language, and that you're one of them. Pick your poison, and start chugging. rd

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  • Guest's Avatar
    Guest started a topic Transferrability of SQL/400 knowledge?

    Transferrability of SQL/400 knowledge?

    It took me 5 minutes to teach my Sequel server expert how to run SQL/400 commands. However I am still struggling for past many months trying to teach him other work environment considerations for AS/400 (e.g. CL commands). SDLC is a tougher. It is a complete subject and is normally taught in the school. It is basically a development methodology and you need to read a whole lot if you do not already know it. Roughly, it has eight steps and everyone has his/her approach, interpretation, definition, etc Each step is a subject itself and has specialist e.g. BA, Designers, Developers, Testers, and Production Support specialist
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