Unconfigured Ad Widget

Collapse

Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

TechTip: Map Your Network Drives to the IBM i

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • Guest's Avatar
    Guest replied
    Re:TechTip: Map Your Network Drives to the IBM i

    ** This thread discusses the article: TechTip: Map Your Network Drives to the IBM i **
    dflaherty, Two possibilities: 1: If you just entered "WRKLNK '/QNTC/192.168.10.13'", you would get the display you describe. You are looking at the entry in the tree for that computer, which is shown as a directory. Place a "5" beside it and press "Enter" to see the contents of the directory. Or, you may start with the command "WRKLNK '/QNTC/192.168.10.13/*'" to see the contents on the first display. 2: Do you have file shares set on on the computer at 192.168.10.13? The contents of the directory that is named with a computer name is the file shares on that computer. If you have not set up the file shares, or if they are not available to the user signed on to the iSeries, the contents of this directory will be blank. This may be easier to see in iSeries Navigator. I hope this helps. Steven C. Dossin, Ph.D. Dossin Business Solutions, Inc. www.dossin.com

    Leave a comment:


  • dflaherty
    replied
    Re:TechTip: Map Your Network Drives to the IBM i

    ** This thread discusses the article: TechTip: Map Your Network Drives to the IBM i **
    After I enter the MKDIR I do a WRKLNK and try to see this directory structure on the file server. All I get is the /QNTC/192.168.10.13 and it has 2 DIR in it 1 is . DDIR and the is .. DDIR if I place a 5 on the .. it shows me the 192.168.10.13 again. (/QNTC/192.168.10.13/../192.168.10.13 ) How would I take a pdf from the IFS and place it in a USER folder several levels deep on the file server?

    Leave a comment:


  • Guest's Avatar
    Guest replied
    Re:TechTip: Map Your Network Drives to the IBM i

    ** This thread discusses the article: TechTip: Map Your Network Drives to the IBM i **
    Shafiq, It is easy to to keep the passwords in synch between the iSeries and the Windows domain with the NWS Enrollment. We have had single sign-on since long before Kerberos. Again, this approach makes life real straight forward for the users. Steven C. Dossin, Ph.D. Dossin Business Solutions, Inc. www.dossin.com

    Leave a comment:


  • shafiqm@toysrus.com
    replied
    Re:TechTip: Map Your Network Drives to the IBM i

    ** This thread discusses the article: TechTip: Map Your Network Drives to the IBM i **
    We are using this for years but inorder to access the as400 files using PC, we need to have same password for windows and as400. Thanks Shafiq

    Leave a comment:


  • Guest's Avatar
    Guest replied
    Re:TechTip: Map Your Network Drives to the IBM i

    ** This thread discusses the article: TechTip: Map Your Network Drives to the IBM i **
    We have been doing this for years. From that experience, I have two additional suggestions: First, do not overlook the power of the symbolic links in the IFS. That allows you to put "shortcuts" into folders that appear as folders when accessed from clients. Yes, Microsoft allows short cuts to folders, but the user must scroll through the files in the directory to get to them since they do not appear in the folders that are typically listed first. This allows one folder to appear in lots of other folders. Second, to help users not save files on unbacked up clients, point my directories to the user's home folder on the IFS, typically set up as /home/username. Combining these techniques, consider having only one share (setup by a log on script) to the home directory with symbolic links to other shared folders. Anytime the user wants to get a file or save a file, Microsoft will typically default to wherever "My Documents" is pointed, so the user will see his home directory in the IFS. In that directory, the user will see a folder (which is the symbolic link in the IFS) that takes him or her to the directory of shared data, so if the file is something shared, they just click on that folder icon rather than back out of my documents to try to find the shared folder. This structure is popular with users and cuts down on the tendency of users to put short cuts on their desktop that must be maintained if the folders are ever moved. Steven C. Dossin, Ph.D. Dossin Business Solutions, Inc. www.dossin.com

    Leave a comment:


  • iSeries24Y
    started a topic TechTip: Map Your Network Drives to the IBM i

    TechTip: Map Your Network Drives to the IBM i

    ** This thread discusses the article: TechTip: Map Your Network Drives to the IBM i **
    ** This thread discusses the Content article: TechTip: Map Your Network Drives to the IBM i **
    This thread discusses the Content article: TechTip: Map Your Network Drives to the IBM i Just an FYI to those thinking about using the IFS for backup. We have been doing this for years but recently ran into a snag with response time when remotely connected. We have an iSeries application that opens documents in Word and Excel and these documents are stored in directories on the IFS (not QDLS). When we are locally connected the time to open or save a document is fine. When we are connected remotely through VPN to open MS Word and Excel documents, access takes literally 10 times as long to open, transmit and/or save the documents. We have been working with IBM PartnerWorld on this issue for about a year. They have brought Microsoft in on the issue. Communications traces show that there is literally ten times the amount of traffic between Word and the iSeries IFS then there is when Word tries to open or save to a PC server. Neither MS or IBM have been able to tell us why or correct the issue. Just recently they actually sent us an email throwing up their hands and recommended to us that we not use the iSeries IFS for this function (saving MS application documents) unless locally connected.
Working...
X