The Dojo Foundation Releases Dojo V1.0

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The Dojo Foundation yesterday announced V1.0 of Dojo, an Open Source JavaScript toolkit for Ajax development that can be used to build rich Web 2.0 applications.

Dojo provides easy-to-use, high-quality UI components and JavaScript infrastructure critical for building responsive Web applications without the need for proprietary plugins or single-vendor solutions. Only 25K in size, the base of Dojo delivers key support for Ajax, progressive enhancement, animations, and opens the door to a wealth of high-quality widgets and extension modules. Dojo supports the Firefox, Safari, Internet Explorer, and Opera browsers.

The Dojo project has attracted a talented and vibrant community of individuals and corporate supporters since its founding in 2004. Dojo is a key part of products from active community members like AOL, BEA, IBM, Sun Microsystems, and many others.

IBM uses Dojo in a number of products including WebSphere Commerce and its popular mashup maker, QEDWiki. "Dojo enabled IBM to create user interfaces that are internationalized and accessible out of the box, which helps us to deliver projects much faster and with more value to our customers," said David Boloker, CTO for Emerging Technologies, IBM Software Group. "And now we will be delivering the Dojo Toolkit in a WebSphere Application Server feature pack for Web 2.0, so that our customers can build rich Web 2.0 style applications using J2EE."

"Congratulations to the entire Dojo community in reaching the 1.0 milestone," said Dylan Schiemann, CEO of SitePen, Inc., and co-founder of the Dojo project. "Dojo 1.0 enables developers and designers to more easily collaborate to build attractive, rich Web interfaces. SitePen proudly offers Dojo development, training, and support services. The feature set makes it a natural choice for the rich, customized applications our customers demand."

The Dojo Toolkit is comprised of three pieces. Dojo Core provides functionality missing from today's Web browsers and helps overcome browser "quirks." Dijit is a collection of rich user interface controls which are skinnable and have global reach through accessible technologies and internationalization. DojoX provides native vector graphics, charting, offline mode, and Comet support, and many more key community extensions to Dojo.

Dojo 1.0 includes:

 

  • Accessibility including keyboard navigation, low vision support, and ARIA markup for assistive technologies
  • High performance grid widget supporting 100,000+ rows of data
  • Browser-native 2-D and 3-D charting
  • A full library of easy-to-use, attractive UI controls
  • Universal data access for simple and fast data-driven widget development
  • Internationalization with localizations provided for 13 major languages
  • CSS-driven themes to make customization and extension simple
  • Dojo Offline, based on Google Gears, which makes offline applications easy to build
  • Support for the OpenAjax Alliance Hub 1.0 to guarantee interoperability with other toolkits
  • Native 2-D and 3-D vector graphics drawing
  • Access to many more widgets and extensions through the Dojo package system


"The Dojo Foundation has made it easy for AOL to contribute code back to the Dojo community, particularly in the area of high performance code loading," said James Burke, lead software design engineer at AOL. "We continue to make Dojo releases available from AOL's content delivery network, free for the community to use, which means you don't even have to download the toolkit to start using it. The Dojo community has made a great toolkit that can be used at both ends of the development spectrum. It enables feature-rich, component-based Web applications, like AOL's Webmail and myAOL personal home pages. The Dojo Toolkit is very capable in more constrained environments too, as illustrated by TinyBuddy IM, an AIM Enabled instant messaging Web application for the iPhone."

"The Dojo Foundation has been a great partner and a terrific working community," said Ed Cobb, vice president, Emerging Technology and Standards, BEA Systems. "We use the Dojo toolkit today in AquaLogic Pages, our business user mash-up platform, and also encourage developers to use the Dojo toolkit to develop their own dynamic applications for use with our WebLogic products. BEA recently expanded its involvement with Dojo technology by becoming a member of the Dojo Foundation. As such, BEA can now leverage many of the native core features of the Dojo 1.0 toolkit in many of our products."

"Dojo has been deployed in production systems for more than two years, and the breadth and maturity of Dojo 1.0 really shows the care taken by all of the project's contributors in building better experiences for everyone," said Alex Russell, Project Lead for the Dojo Toolkit. "Dojo 1.0 gives developers and designers fluid ways to iterate on designs and complex, data-driven behaviors. Dojo's architecture lets teams easily build themeable, modular, responsive interfaces that can be easily localized and optimized for deployment."

"The release of Dojo 1.0 is an important industry event. The Dojo Foundation is a member of the OpenAjax Alliance Steering Committee, is active on multiple OpenAjax committees, and has participated in both of our InteropFest events," said Jon Ferraiolo, secretary of the OpenAjax Alliance. "We are very happy that Dojo 1.0 includes the OpenAjax Hub as this will promote the ability for application developers to combine Dojo with other Ajax toolkits within the same Web application."

Dojo can be downloaded today from http://dojotoolkit.org and is made available under the commercially friendly BSD and AFL licenses.

IBM's Involvement

Back in June 2006, IBM announced plans to contribute key intellectual assets to the open source community, in an effort to help companies and software developers adopt and share best practices for Ajax software development.

The software contributions were to foster an industry collaboration and adoption of Ajax, a technology that improves Web application responsiveness, and does so at a lower cost point and with less complexity. The technology contributions were to extend the code already available in the Dojo Toolkit enabling internationalization of applications and making them fully accessible to persons with disabilities through a variety of assistive technologies, including DHTML and Accessible widgets. IBM's donation was to extend the data model already in the Dojo Toolkit and provide a foundation architecture and Web-based tools for the industry to engineer, collaborate on, share and reuse software development best practices. The resulting effort is the Dojo Toolkit V1.0 announced yesterday.

Ajax, short for Asynchronous JavaScript+XML, is a type of "Rich Internet Application." The technology enables greater usability and responsiveness of browser-based applications, with the benefits of a zero-install and extremely low maintenance of Web development. Developers have the ability to update portions of a Web page without refreshing the entire screen. This can enable users to scroll through a virtual map or photographs without refreshing their browser screens. Additionally, developers can allow users to drag and drop objects inside a Web browser similar to the capabilities available on computer desktops to move folders and documents around. Ajax provides the ability to develop rich buttons sets, icons, scroll bars, menus and widgets that can ease and speed navigation, as well as simplify information retrieval.

"The breadth and depth of experience, and IBM's continued support of Open Source and Dojo in particular, have been tremendous," said Russell. "IBM's contributions are creating the foundation for even broader adoption of dynamic Web interfaces, even for users that have traditionally not benefited from them. It's clear that IBM is serious about improving the lives of their users and our community is excited to be a part of that."

IBM provided expertise to integrate Dynamic Web Accessibility into the Dojo Toolkit widget set. The Dynamic Web Accessibility specification was developed within the World Wide Web Consortium's (W3C) Web Accessibility Initiative. It provides a mechanism for creating rich user interface components on the Web which are fully accessible via the keyboard and when using assistive technologies such as screen readers and screen magnifiers. This enhanced accessibility, which mimics the behavior of client side user interface controls, is crucial for supporting the rich internet applications built using Ajax and Dojo.

The Dojo Foundation manages the open source JavaScript toolkit that makes professional Ajax web development easier and faster. By contributing intellectual property to help establish a common, open industry framework and ecosystem around Ajax software development, IBM together with the Dojo Foundation and others, hopes to foster more innovation and adoption of Ajax, Boloker said last year. "The Dojo Foundation is an ideal partner for these contributions because of their strong growing community, talented developers, extensible architecture and powerful and innovative abstractions for JavaScript."

Open Standards for Ajax

Open Standards such as DHTML, JavaScript, Cascading Style Sheets, and XML are core to Ajax development activities. Developers must deliver quality applications that meet business goals, visually satisfy customers, and adhere to time and budget requirements. IBM's goal is to help businesses leverage open standards and open source to increase overall interoperability of Ajax based solutions, the company said.

The open sourced Ajax technology is designed to improve software development practices within organizations and throughout the industry. It also could improve the ability to quickly respond to business and market changes that businesses are achieving through standardization in other areas, such as Web services and Service-Oriented Architecture standards that integrate previously siloed data and applications with customers, partners, and suppliers.

"IBM is doing for the Ajax software development process what Eclipse has done for the integration of software tools, what Apache did for Web application servers and what Linux did for operating systems," said Boloker. "This technology contribution enables the greater community and our customers."

The effort represents another milestone in IBM's commitment to open standards and open source technology, the company said. IBM participates in and contributes to more than 150 open source projects—more than any other company. These include Linux, the Globus Alliance, Apache, Eclipse, Cloudscape, the contribution of accessibility technology to Mozilla to make the Firefox browser easier to use by people with disabilities, and the donation of 500 patents from across IBM's portfolio into open source.

About the Dojo Foundation

. The Dojo Foundation is a 501(c)(6) non-profit dedicated to creating a level playing field for the development of new Open Web technologies. The Dojo Foundation hosts a growing number of projects including the Dojo Toolkit, OpenRecord, and Cometd. As of a year ago, the Foundation had received code contributions from over 200 individuals and 35 corporations worldwide, and that number has been far exceeded today. Online at http://dojotoolkit.org/foundation.

 

About Dojo

Dojo is an Open Source DHTML toolkit written in JavaScript. It builds on several contributed code bases (nWidgets, Burstlib, f(m)), which is why developers refer to it sometimes as a "unified" toolkit. Dojo aims to solve some long-standing historical problems with DHTML which prevented mass adoption of dynamic Web application development.

Dojo allows you to easily build dynamic capabilities into Web pages and any other environment that supports JavaScript sanely. You can use the components that Dojo provides to make your Web sites more usable, responsive, and functional. With Dojo you can build degradable user interfaces more easily, prototype interactive widgets quickly, and animate transitions. You can use the lower-level APIs and compatibility layers from Dojo to write portable JavaScript and simplify complex scripts. Dojo's event system, I/O APIs, and generic language enhancement form the basis of a powerful programming environment. You can use the Dojo build tools to write command-line unit-tests for your JavaScript code. The Dojo build process helps you optimize your JavaScript for deployment by grouping sets of files together and reuse those groups through "profiles".

Dojo does all of these things by layering capabilities onto a very small core which provides the package system and little else. When you write scripts with Dojo, you can include as little or as much of the available APIs as you need to suit your needs. Dojo provides multiple points of entry, interpreter independence, forward looking APIs, and focuses on reducing barriers to adoption.

The Dojo Foundation yesterday announced V1.0 of Dojo, an Open Source JavaScript toolkit for Ajax development that can be used to build rich Web 2.0 applications.

Dojo provides easy-to-use, high-quality UI components and JavaScript infrastructure critical for building responsive Web applications without the need for proprietary plugins or single-vendor solutions. Only 25K in size, the base of Dojo delivers key support for Ajax, progressive enhancement, animations, and opens the door to a wealth of high-quality widgets and extension modules. Dojo supports the Firefox, Safari, Internet Explorer, and Opera browsers.

The Dojo project has attracted a talented and vibrant community of individuals and corporate supporters since its founding in 2004. Dojo is a key part of products from active community members like AOL, BEA, IBM, Sun Microsystems, and many others.

IBM uses Dojo in a number of products including WebSphere Commerce and its popular mashup maker, QEDWiki. "Dojo enabled IBM to create user interfaces that are internationalized and accessible out of the box, which helps us to deliver projects much faster and with more value to our customers," said David Boloker, CTO for Emerging Technologies, IBM Software Group. "And now we will be delivering the Dojo Toolkit in a WebSphere Application Server feature pack for Web 2.0, so that our customers can build rich Web 2.0 style applications using J2EE."

"Congratulations to the entire Dojo community in reaching the 1.0 milestone," said Dylan Schiemann, CEO of SitePen, Inc., and co-founder of the Dojo project. "Dojo 1.0 enables developers and designers to more easily collaborate to build attractive, rich Web interfaces. SitePen proudly offers Dojo development, training, and support services. The feature set makes it a natural choice for the rich, customized applications our customers demand."

The Dojo Toolkit is comprised of three pieces. Dojo Core provides functionality missing from today's Web browsers and helps overcome browser "quirks." Dijit is a collection of rich user interface controls which are skinnable and have global reach through accessible technologies and internationalization. DojoX provides native vector graphics, charting, offline mode, and Comet support, and many more key community extensions to Dojo.

Dojo 1.0 includes:

 

  • Accessibility including keyboard navigation, low vision support, and ARIA markup for assistive technologies
  • High performance grid widget supporting 100,000+ rows of data
  • Browser-native 2-D and 3-D charting
  • A full library of easy-to-use, attractive UI controls
  • Universal data access for simple and fast data-driven widget development
  • Internationalization with localizations provided for 13 major languages
  • CSS-driven themes to make customization and extension simple
  • Dojo Offline, based on Google Gears, which makes offline applications easy to build
  • Support for the OpenAjax Alliance Hub 1.0 to guarantee interoperability with other toolkits
  • Native 2-D and 3-D vector graphics drawing
  • Access to many more widgets and extensions through the Dojo package system


"The Dojo Foundation has made it easy for AOL to contribute code back to the Dojo community, particularly in the area of high performance code loading," said James Burke, lead software design engineer at AOL. "We continue to make Dojo releases available from AOL's content delivery network, free for the community to use, which means you don't even have to download the toolkit to start using it. The Dojo community has made a great toolkit that can be used at both ends of the development spectrum. It enables feature-rich, component-based Web applications, like AOL's Webmail and myAOL personal home pages. The Dojo Toolkit is very capable in more constrained environments too, as illustrated by TinyBuddy IM, an AIM Enabled instant messaging Web application for the iPhone."

"The Dojo Foundation has been a great partner and a terrific working community," said Ed Cobb, vice president, Emerging Technology and Standards, BEA Systems. "We use the Dojo toolkit today in AquaLogic Pages, our business user mash-up platform, and also encourage developers to use the Dojo toolkit to develop their own dynamic applications for use with our WebLogic products. BEA recently expanded its involvement with Dojo technology by becoming a member of the Dojo Foundation. As such, BEA can now leverage many of the native core features of the Dojo 1.0 toolkit in many of our products."

"Dojo has been deployed in production systems for more than two years, and the breadth and maturity of Dojo 1.0 really shows the care taken by all of the project's contributors in building better experiences for everyone," said Alex Russell, Project Lead for the Dojo Toolkit. "Dojo 1.0 gives developers and designers fluid ways to iterate on designs and complex, data-driven behaviors. Dojo's architecture lets teams easily build themeable, modular, responsive interfaces that can be easily localized and optimized for deployment."

"The release of Dojo 1.0 is an important industry event. The Dojo Foundation is a member of the OpenAjax Alliance Steering Committee, is active on multiple OpenAjax committees, and has participated in both of our InteropFest events," said Jon Ferraiolo, secretary of the OpenAjax Alliance. "We are very happy that Dojo 1.0 includes the OpenAjax Hub as this will promote the ability for application developers to combine Dojo with other Ajax toolkits within the same Web application."

Dojo can be downloaded today from http://dojotoolkit.org and is made available under the commercially friendly BSD and AFL licenses.

IBM's Involvement

Back in June 2006, IBM announced plans to contribute key intellectual assets to the open source community, in an effort to help companies and software developers adopt and share best practices for Ajax software development.

The software contributions were to foster an industry collaboration and adoption of Ajax, a technology that improves Web application responsiveness, and does so at a lower cost point and with less complexity. The technology contributions were to extend the code already available in the Dojo Toolkit enabling internationalization of applications and making them fully accessible to persons with disabilities through a variety of assistive technologies, including DHTML and Accessible widgets. IBM's donation was to extend the data model already in the Dojo Toolkit and provide a foundation architecture and Web-based tools for the industry to engineer, collaborate on, share and reuse software development best practices. The resulting effort is the Dojo Toolkit V1.0 announced yesterday.

Ajax, short for Asynchronous JavaScript+XML, is a type of "Rich Internet Application." The technology enables greater usability and responsiveness of browser-based applications, with the benefits of a zero-install and extremely low maintenance of Web development. Developers have the ability to update portions of a Web page without refreshing the entire screen. This can enable users to scroll through a virtual map or photographs without refreshing their browser screens. Additionally, developers can allow users to drag and drop objects inside a Web browser similar to the capabilities available on computer desktops to move folders and documents around. Ajax provides the ability to develop rich buttons sets, icons, scroll bars, menus and widgets that can ease and speed navigation, as well as simplify information retrieval.

"The breadth and depth of experience, and IBM's continued support of Open Source and Dojo in particular, have been tremendous," said Russell. "IBM's contributions are creating the foundation for even broader adoption of dynamic Web interfaces, even for users that have traditionally not benefited from them. It's clear that IBM is serious about improving the lives of their users and our community is excited to be a part of that."

IBM provided expertise to integrate Dynamic Web Accessibility into the Dojo Toolkit widget set. The Dynamic Web Accessibility specification was developed within the World Wide Web Consortium's (W3C) Web Accessibility Initiative. It provides a mechanism for creating rich user interface components on the Web which are fully accessible via the keyboard and when using assistive technologies such as screen readers and screen magnifiers. This enhanced accessibility, which mimics the behavior of client side user interface controls, is crucial for supporting the rich internet applications built using Ajax and Dojo.

The Dojo Foundation manages the open source JavaScript toolkit that makes professional Ajax web development easier and faster. By contributing intellectual property to help establish a common, open industry framework and ecosystem around Ajax software development, IBM together with the Dojo Foundation and others, hopes to foster more innovation and adoption of Ajax, Boloker said last year. "The Dojo Foundation is an ideal partner for these contributions because of their strong growing community, talented developers, extensible architecture and powerful and innovative abstractions for JavaScript."

Open Standards for Ajax

Open Standards such as DHTML, JavaScript, Cascading Style Sheets, and XML are core to Ajax development activities. Developers must deliver quality applications that meet business goals, visually satisfy customers, and adhere to time and budget requirements. IBM's goal is to help businesses leverage open standards and open source to increase overall interoperability of Ajax based solutions, the company said.

The open sourced Ajax technology is designed to improve software development practices within organizations and throughout the industry. It also could improve the ability to quickly respond to business and market changes that businesses are achieving through standardization in other areas, such as Web services and Service-Oriented Architecture standards that integrate previously siloed data and applications with customers, partners, and suppliers.

"IBM is doing for the Ajax software development process what Eclipse has done for the integration of software tools, what Apache did for Web application servers and what Linux did for operating systems," said Boloker. "This technology contribution enables the greater community and our customers."

The effort represents another milestone in IBM's commitment to open standards and open source technology, the company said. IBM participates in and contributes to more than 150 open source projects—more than any other company. These include Linux, the Globus Alliance, Apache, Eclipse, Cloudscape, the contribution of accessibility technology to Mozilla to make the Firefox browser easier to use by people with disabilities, and the donation of 500 patents from across IBM's portfolio into open source.

About the Dojo Foundation

. The Dojo Foundation is a 501(c)(6) non-profit dedicated to creating a level playing field for the development of new Open Web technologies. The Dojo Foundation hosts a growing number of projects including the Dojo Toolkit, OpenRecord, and Cometd. As of a year ago, the Foundation had received code contributions from over 200 individuals and 35 corporations worldwide, and that number has been far exceeded today. Online at http://dojotoolkit.org/foundation.

 

About Dojo

Dojo is an Open Source DHTML toolkit written in JavaScript. It builds on several contributed code bases (nWidgets, Burstlib, f(m)), which is why developers refer to it sometimes as a "unified" toolkit. Dojo aims to solve some long-standing historical problems with DHTML which prevented mass adoption of dynamic Web application development.

Dojo allows you to easily build dynamic capabilities into Web pages and any other environment that supports JavaScript sanely. You can use the components that Dojo provides to make your Web sites more usable, responsive, and functional. With Dojo you can build degradable user interfaces more easily, prototype interactive widgets quickly, and animate transitions. You can use the lower-level APIs and compatibility layers from Dojo to write portable JavaScript and simplify complex scripts. Dojo's event system, I/O APIs, and generic language enhancement form the basis of a powerful programming environment. You can use the Dojo build tools to write command-line unit-tests for your JavaScript code. The Dojo build process helps you optimize your JavaScript for deployment by grouping sets of files together and reuse those groups through "profiles".

Dojo does all of these things by layering capabilities onto a very small core which provides the package system and little else. When you write scripts with Dojo, you can include as little or as much of the available APIs as you need to suit your needs. Dojo provides multiple points of entry, interpreter independence, forward looking APIs, and focuses on reducing barriers to adoption.

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