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Can MySQL Become YourSQL?

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  • Can MySQL Become YourSQL?

    ** This thread discusses the article: Can MySQL Become YourSQL? **
    ** This thread discusses the Content article: Can MySQL Become YourSQL?0

  • #2
    Can MySQL Become YourSQL?

    ** This thread discusses the article: Can MySQL Become YourSQL? **
    Mr Stockwell Said: The perception by customers seems to be "Why should I buy a System i to run a PHP/MySQL application if I can get the same application to run on a PC server?" Cost, again, is the sticking point. Reply: No. it is deeper than that, Cost IS an issue. Utility is the other. Both PHP/MySQL run on Linux and Windows servers ... the same ones they already have now. Or, to look at it from the other side, An Intel box can run everything except OS/400. The iSeries can only run what IBM, by design, allows it to run. By selling a machine that excels in a long and thin area, IBM has painted itself into a corner it still is not clever enough to escape from. IBM must sell customers on WHY new customers need to look past this exclusiveness and install an otherwise limited purpose machine.

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    • #3
      Can MySQL Become YourSQL?

      ** This thread discusses the article: Can MySQL Become YourSQL? **
      "An Intel box can run everything except OS/400. The iSeries can only run what IBM, by design, allows it to run." An interesting perspective but clearly somewhat provincial, I'm afraid. The limitations of what Intel boxes MIGHT run DO NOT define the universe of computing -- though Intel's predominance in the popular mind-set may make us believe that. Not to quibble, but if we believe this hype, we'll be stuck with the limitations of Intel -- which can not run many mission critical applications that are on mainframe machines and "mini's" like the System i. Secondly, IBM does NOT control what can run on the System i. Instead, the System i is built around international standards that enable any organization to port application suites. Those standards are far wider than those supported by any single operating system on the Intel platform. These standards are NOT controlled by IBM, but by the industry. What's missing is the impetus by vendors to port or implement on the platform. That's what IBM is doing in partnership with Zend (PHP) and MySQL AB (MySQL database): Providing impetus and technical support. Another aspect of the problem is that -- because you can run multiple OSs on the System i, it's often confusing for both customers and potential suppliers about "how" those implementations will be run. What Mark Shearer and others at IBM Rochester are doing is making the horsepower understandable and available to other vendors, expanding the application potential by opening key services with high customer and developer visibility. They are not playing "catch up" but are truly "reaching out" to the industry to open the doors of potential. They are betting that, if they are successful, it will attract new applications and business partners to a truly "open" environment.

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      • #4
        Can MySQL Become YourSQL?

        ** This thread discusses the article: Can MySQL Become YourSQL? **
        Thomas wrote: Finally, because MySQL and PHP on the System i reside inside the larger security envelope of i5/OS, there's a general belief—still not proven—that there is a stronger potential to keep hackers at bay. Excellent article and followup answer. Concerning security, there are several aspects of i5/OS that will frustrate would be hackers: - first and foremost, the object based i5/OS. Much of hacking is dependent upon Windows OS vulnerabilities. - second, the Power CPU instead of an Intel CPU. That which isn't dependent on Windows alone is often dependent on the Intel CPU instruction set under Windows or Linux. - third, lack of familiar Unix foils such as root exploits. i5/OS object based security should be the envy of the computing world, and any organization that stores critical data such as the government and health organizations. - fourth, common internal use of EBCDIC data. This further frustrates exploits based on ASCII data. - lastly, restrictions on accessing or changing anything based on both user role and object authority restrictions. They can try to hack, but they can't crack. The phrase "legendary security" will be appended to PHP for System i before long. rd

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