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TechTip: MS Excel--They Gotta Have It!

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  • David Abramowitz
    replied
    TechTip: MS Excel--They Gotta Have It!

    ** This thread discusses the article: TechTip: MS Excel--They Gotta Have It! **
    Thank you for your kind remarks. You would only have to use the CPYFRMQRYF command if you have used the OPNQRYF command. The CPYFRMQRYF command will create a new physical file (even if you have specified an LF in the OPNQRYF command) which can then be processed by the CPYTOIMPF command. I use the Job Schedule Entry functions to automate programs. This is free with OS/400 and requires no additional third party products. To get started with Job Schedule Entries, use the WRKJOBSCDE command. Dave

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  • Guest's Avatar
    Guest replied
    TechTip: MS Excel--They Gotta Have It!

    ** This thread discusses the article: TechTip: MS Excel--They Gotta Have It! **
    "The users are home in bed sleeping when the jobs are run." I liked your idea of automation. I have used CSV types before, but with user intervention, dealing with CPYTOIMPF and using FTP together to get my CSV. May I ask, where does CPYFRMQRYF comes in? How do you automate it? Thank you for sharing your tech-tips. It is greatly appreciated. GOD BLESS! =) Joan

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  • Guest's Avatar
    Guest replied
    TechTip: MS Excel--They Gotta Have It!

    ** This thread discusses the article: TechTip: MS Excel--They Gotta Have It! **
    David Abramowitz wrote: > Perhaps you would like to discern your methods in a form of a tech > tip, so that all readers could share your technique. Then he wouldn't have a product to sell. Bill

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  • David Abramowitz
    replied
    TechTip: MS Excel--They Gotta Have It!

    ** This thread discusses the article: TechTip: MS Excel--They Gotta Have It! **
    As I stated in my article, it is possible to accomplish the end goals in a variety of ways. The method I chose was a simplified way of automating the means. With a bit of work, one could put in Excel headers, and Column headers for any file. That was not the purpose of the article. Perhaps you would like to discern your methods in a form of a tech tip, so that all readers could share your technique. Dave

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  • andreas.goering@web.de
    replied
    TechTip: MS Excel--They Gotta Have It!

    ** This thread discusses the article: TechTip: MS Excel--They Gotta Have It! **
    Hello, the tools discussed here are very fine anyway. I'm sure they are useful to many people of this community. For those who want more we invite to have a look to our site http://www.goering.us Our tool "iExcelGen" generates real Excelfiles native at the lovely AS/400 (sorry: IBM eServer iSeries). CSV was not enough for our customers.... Kind regards Andreas Goering GOERING iSeries Solutions

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  • dchristie
    replied
    TechTip: MS Excel--They Gotta Have It!

    ** This thread discusses the article: TechTip: MS Excel--They Gotta Have It! **
    We use the CPYTOPCD or CPYTOIMPF commands. If you copy to QDLS, the file name must be a total of 12 characters. V5R1 example
     Chgvar &DOCNAME ('PR' |< &JOBNBR |< '.XML') Chgvar &TOSTMF ('/QDLS/TEMP/' |< &DOCNAME) CPYTOIMPF FROMFILE(QTEMP/FILE) TOSTMF(&TOSTMF) + MBROPT(*ADD) STMFCODPAG(*PCASCII) + RCDDLM(*CRLF) STRDLM(*NONE) 
    or
     Chgvar &DOCNAME ('SF' |< &JOBNBR |< '.CSV') CPYTOPCD FROMFILE(QTEMP/SPLF) TOFLR(TEMP) + TODOC(&DOCNAME) REPLACE(*YES) 

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  • Guest's Avatar
    Guest replied
    TechTip: MS Excel--They Gotta Have It!

    ** This thread discusses the article: TechTip: MS Excel--They Gotta Have It! **
    QDLS only supports the 8.3 naming standard, shorten your name to fit in this and it should work. Scott Mildenberger

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  • Guest's Avatar
    Guest replied
    TechTip: MS Excel--They Gotta Have It!

    ** This thread discusses the article: TechTip: MS Excel--They Gotta Have It! **
    I copied a PF to a directory in the IFS file in '.csv' format and it works fine and I am able to open it in EXCEL, but I am not able to copy to a folder in 'QDLS/myfolder/myworksheet.csv'. How to copy a PF directly to a folder. I have a batch program that converts PF to Excel and I want it to send using SNDDST but it prompts for folder not directory. Any help will be greatly appreciated. Sky

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  • David Abramowitz
    replied
    TechTip: MS Excel--They Gotta Have It!

    ** This thread discusses the article: TechTip: MS Excel--They Gotta Have It! **
    Compare this to the time required to create and email the CSV to each user that desires it. FYI, this may be done in batch. For my purposes, it is done in batch. Dave

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  • David Abramowitz
    replied
    TechTip: MS Excel--They Gotta Have It!

    ** This thread discusses the article: TechTip: MS Excel--They Gotta Have It! **
    The situation here, is that there are regular overnight production runs that produce a variety of updates, and reports. These are long convoluted job streams that massage data into temporary work files, and are often six processing steps or greater. The users desired to have the reports in spreadsheet format. ergo: The users are home in bed sleeping when the jobs are run, they can not be at their desks starting a VBA macro. The CSV files are produced and e-mailed without user intervention. To reiterate, these are production runs. The user is not in the picture until the e-mail is received. I am familiar with VBA, and use it for a variety of purposes. VBA is an excellent tool, but does not provide the kind of full automation I described in the article. You are correct that headings, and full formatting does not occur (certain fields do format). There are third party tools that will accomplish these goals from the host side, and certainly you could create a more sophisticated automatic download given enough time and budget. Once again this was not the purpose of the "tip". If your shop has no need of this sort of functionality, then you should take note of the technique just in case the need arises. Dave

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  • Guest's Avatar
    Guest replied
    TechTip: MS Excel--They Gotta Have It!

    ** This thread discusses the article: TechTip: MS Excel--They Gotta Have It! **
    David, You mention the time required to set up MS Query on each desktop and what is necessary to get the ODBC driver setup as well. Compare this to the time required to create and email the CSV to each user that desires it. With Query set up and the ODBC set up, they could then refresh the data themselves without any involvement from you. If your users are "addicted" to the CSV format, I could just about guarantee they'll drop that addiction for the MS Query method. Try it out on just a couple at first and see what they think. Bill David Christie wrote: > The article is bang on concerning Excel. We have implemented a > similar method as described in the article and it is the preferred > method for reports. It's come to the point where the users will > demand an option to email the CSV to them when we create a new > report. > > Most of our reports (i.e ATB's etc) are run during the evening, > zipped and emailed to the recipient for the next morning. We also use > this technique for outside clients, vendors etc. Most don't believe > it comes from the old green screen AS400 (actually the zip and > encryption comes from the PC, but I give credit to the AS400). > > For physical files, we run a few commands to insert the file fields > into a work file, then copy the file to the work file. This way > headings will also be sent. > > For spooled files, we format the output with commas (creating a CSV > file in the PRTF), copy it and email the results. The spooled file > method gives you complete control over the layout, but can be messy. > > Except for my PC, I've stayed away from MS Query, we would have a > difficult time installing it on each PC (the add on is not standard), > and I believe you must also configure ODBC (may be wrong there). But > Bill is correct in that it is a great way to present data. > > Great article in reminding everyone of what is a very powerful > business tool, I mean the AS400 of course, but so is Excel! > > Thanks

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  • Guest's Avatar
    Guest replied
    TechTip: MS Excel--They Gotta Have It!

    ** This thread discusses the article: TechTip: MS Excel--They Gotta Have It! **
    David Abramowitz wrote: > As I stated in the article, there are many ways to accomplish the > goal of creating the spreadsheet, but fewer ways of automating the > process. Agree somewhat. > There is nothing wrong with using MS Query, or Crystal Reports, or > other means to obtain the data when the user is there, but delivering > the spreadsheet on an automated basis, i.e. without any user > interaction, is a different issue. But sending a delimited file is not sending a spreadsheet, it's just sending a data file - there aren't any column headers, the print page isn't formatted, the data columns might be of the wrong format and no further data manipulation can occur without human intervention - unless you are coding these things in a Visual Basic for Applications macro. Spreadsheets can be automated to do just about anything through the use of VBA. You could even build a spreadsheet that would automatically download the data and then have it email itself without any intervention. Bill

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  • David Abramowitz
    replied
    TechTip: MS Excel--They Gotta Have It!

    ** This thread discusses the article: TechTip: MS Excel--They Gotta Have It! **
    As I stated in the article, there are many ways to accomplish the goal of creating the spreadsheet, but fewer ways of automating the process. There is nothing wrong with using MS Query, or Crystal Reports, or other means to obtain the data when the user is there, but delivering the spreadsheet on an automated basis, i.e. without any user interaction, is a different issue. Dave

    Leave a comment:


  • dchristie
    replied
    TechTip: MS Excel--They Gotta Have It!

    ** This thread discusses the article: TechTip: MS Excel--They Gotta Have It! **
    The article is bang on concerning Excel. We have implemented a similar method as described in the article and it is the preferred method for reports. It's come to the point where the users will demand an option to email the CSV to them when we create a new report. Most of our reports (i.e ATB's etc) are run during the evening, zipped and emailed to the recipient for the next morning. We also use this technique for outside clients, vendors etc. Most don't believe it comes from the old green screen AS400 (actually the zip and encryption comes from the PC, but I give credit to the AS400). For physical files, we run a few commands to insert the file fields into a work file, then copy the file to the work file. This way headings will also be sent. For spooled files, we format the output with commas (creating a CSV file in the PRTF), copy it and email the results. The spooled file method gives you complete control over the layout, but can be messy. Except for my PC, I've stayed away from MS Query, we would have a difficult time installing it on each PC (the add on is not standard), and I believe you must also configure ODBC (may be wrong there). But Bill is correct in that it is a great way to present data. Great article in reminding everyone of what is a very powerful business tool, I mean the AS400 of course, but so is Excel! Thanks

    Leave a comment:


  • Guest's Avatar
    Guest replied
    TechTip: MS Excel--They Gotta Have It!

    ** This thread discusses the article: TechTip: MS Excel--They Gotta Have It! **
    MC WebMaster wrote: > This is a discussion about TechTip: MS Excel--They Gotta Have It!. Ick, this puts a lot of work on the user and reduces the reusability of a spreadsheet. I have found great success by creating MS Query's into the spreadsheet. This way the data will already be formatted for the user and, for many queries, they only have to refresh the data to get the current statistics. Parameterized queries add even more power to the user. If you were to show a group of users the right query and then show them the results of processing this data through a pivot table, you could experience your first standing ovation. Bill

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