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Be Our Guest - Trade Agreements and Visas

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  • Be Our Guest - Trade Agreements and Visas

    From the same article: The United States is more generous than it needs to be in its commitments to provide access to guestworkers. Tighter rules on duration of stay, for example, would be more in keeping with international norms. Dave

  • #2
    Be Our Guest - Trade Agreements and Visas

    This "Be Our Guest - Trade Agreements and Visas" article provides statistics on immigration for the following work visas: H-1B, L-1, and NAFTA (TN, B-1, E visas). These visas affect the following occupations: Executive, Administrative, and Managerial Occupations, Engineers, Writers, artists, entertainers, and athletes, Computer, mathematical, and operations scientists, Natural scientists, Health assessment and treatment occupations (nurses, etc.), Teachers (inc. college and university), Health diagnosing or treating occupations (doctors, etc.), Architects and surveyors, Lawyers and judges, Social scientists and urban planners, Social, recreation, and religious workers, Vocational and educational counselors, Librarians, archivists, and curators, Marketing and sales personnel, Technologists and technicians, Administrative support, including clerical, Service occupations Household, food service, etc.), Precision production, craft, & repair occupations, Operators, fabricators, and laborers, Farming, forestry, and fishing occupations. Interestingly, there were 269,766 immigrants in 2002 who entered the country with a work visa, yet their occupation is unknown or not reported. Be Our Guest Trade Agreements and Visas By Jessica Vaughan Center for Immigration Studies Backgrounder, December 2003 http://www.cis.org/articles/2003/back1803.html

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    • #3
      Be Our Guest - Trade Agreements and Visas

      Much is yet to be done -- many continue to speak about the visa situations and how they are abused, but the trade agreements and other politics that is surfacing (like Pres. Bush's new logic to allow illegals to work in the US as long as they can prove a job is awaiting them) is also among the issues. There is an instance of an appliance maker moving from Greenville, MI to Mexico -- the reasoning is to save $81 million yearly, but can we expect that any of these savings reach the consumers. Not likely, just the "rich" padding there pockets due to trade agreements opening the borders to cheaper workers. As far as Pres. Bush's ideas of illegals working in the US when jobs are waiting -- what are the requirements for how these individuals are paid -- pay level, taxes, etc?? Also, which government office is going to administer these (and allow abuses of the system) to ensure that American workers are not being replaced simply because a foreigner can be paid 10% of minimum and somehow slip through the cracks of the system and go unnoticed. Thankfully, it is nearing election time -- any politician who wants to keep there job, better be looking into the issues will rampant replacement of American workers with foreign cheaper workers -- whatever cause (visas, trade agreements, etc.). Thank you - Lee.

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